Tag Archive | Grasmere walk

Wintery Grasmere Walk

Up till now it can only have been described as a rather wet miserable winter. Nothing like the last few years where we have had a really good amount of snow. However things changed earlier this week and I was able to get out and about around Rydal and Grasmere.

Snowy Grasmere

Snowy Grasmere

The cloud was right down and it was debatable whether it would be brighter higher up but it was nice to get out without being rained on!.

Rydal Water

Rydal Water

A watery sunshine was trying to break through the mist.

Rydal

Rydal

I decided to wander up by Rydal caves and then decide which direction to continue in.

Across Rydal

Across Rydal

Gradually I was getting above the low cloud and arrived at a snowy Rydal caves.

Rydal Caves

Rydal Caves

Hardly a soul about. Crisp snow not too trampled yet.

Loughrigg

Loughrigg

Just a couple of folk on the horizon, and now well above the clouds.

Above the clouds

Above the clouds

Time to head back down to Grasmere.

Heading to Grasmere

Heading to Grasmere

It looked very cold down in the valley, it’s amazing how it can vary from one vale to the next.

Across the Lake

Across the Lake

It was starting to look very grey in the direction of Dunmail Raise. Allan Bank standing out across the lake.

Towards Allan Bank

Towards Allan Bank

The best part of the day had been and gone and it was getting very chilly. Time to head home for a warm drink.

Grasmere

Grasmere

This walk was earlier in the week and the snow has lain on the hills. It was forecast that we were going to have huge amounts of snow over night last night, however we seem to have escaped the worst and the heavy snow has been centred on Wales, Bristol and the South. It is just very, very cold and now icy underfoot. More snow forecast for the weekend. Watch this space….

Snowy Grasmere

Snowy Grasmere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grasmere Riverside Walk

River Rothay Grasmere

This is a nice little circular walk round the village and takes you away from the traffic heading through the village. Suitable for wheelchairs and prams too, although it can get a bit muddy after heavy rain. It can be accessed from various places in the village.

Grasmere School

I started at the Stock Lane car park and walked along Stock Lane into the village past the village school, there used to be access through the school yard but this has been stopped as it wasn’t great when the children were out playing having random walkers crossing the playground. You can still connect to it this way at School holidays and weekends. Handy to know you can also park in the school yard during these times for a small donation through the school letter box for school funds.

Church Bridge

Crossing the river at church bridge you come to St. Oswalds church.

St Oswalds Church Grasmere

Dedicated to St Oswald, a 7th Century king of Northumbria. The oldest parts of the present church date back to Medieval times. Take the path through the churchyard which comes out at the Grasmere Gingerbread shop.

Grasmere Gingerbread Shop

The aroma will reach you before you get there. Hard to believe this tiny building was once the village school. You can also take a slight detour to your right to the Grasmere Daffodil Garden. Across from the gingerbread shop is Church Stile.

Church Stile Grasmere

A row of 17th century cottages which house the Storytellers Garden. Always worth a visit if Taffy Thomas Storyteller Laureate is at home.

You can go down to the right of the gingerbread shop beside the Wordsworth Hotel to join the riverside walk but we are carrying on through the village. Keep straight on and walk up College Street. On your right is the village green with Heaton Cooper Art Studios in front of you.

Heaton Cooper Studios Grasmere

Sam Read’s bookshop is to your left. Grasmere has a wonderful selection of independent and individual shops you won’t find anywhere else.

Sam Read's Bookshop Grasmere

Turn left at Sam Read’s and you are now on Broadgate. The whitewashed cottage across the open field to your left is a listed building called Dockwray. Dorothy Wordsworth recorded in her Grasmere Journal a visit to the cottage on May 28th 1800 to see her friend Jenny Dockewray.

Broadgate Grasmere

Walk along Broadgate until you reach the village Hall just beyond the row of shops. This is where the annual Lakes Artists Exhibition takes place in the summer. Turn down the side signposted car park while looking to your left over Broadgate meadow. You will see Grasmere’s war memorial located on a grassy bank. Close by is the “Peace oak” planted by Canon Rawnsley founder of the National Trust. It was planted on the 19th July 1919 to commemorate the fifth anniversary of the start of the Great War.

Surrounding Fells

At the far side of the car park is a footbridge over the River Rothay, this is where we are going. From here there are great views of the Fells to the East especially Stone Arthur, with it’s rocky summit, and Heron Pike the fell further to the right. The rest of the walk is along the riverside back in the direction we started from. There are several good opportunities to take photos along the way.

Grasmere signpost

You can cut up to the main road at one point or head across the fields to the Swan Hotel. In the summer months red campion flowers along the riverbank, and if you are very lucky you may see a flash of blue as a Kingfisher darts by.

Grasmere Riverside Walk

After crossing a wooden bridge, carry on until you come to a metal bridge. This is the Millennium Bridge,

Grasmere Millennium Bridge

Built, yes you guessed it, to celebrate the Millennium.

Millenium Stone

Cross over and head to the right  with Grasmere Sports field on your left,past the workingmans club and along the little lane to your left.

Grasmere Sports Field

This brings you back to the main carpark where we started. There are toilets situated here but be aware they are not open in the winter months. That’s the Riverside walk finished but perhaps visit Dove Cottage which is out of the car park to your left, and rounds off the day nicely. Nice tea rooms there too.

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