Tag Archive | Grasmere Daffodil Garden

Nearly there….

View towards Helm Crag

As lockdown Three starts easing and holiday homes, non essential shops, outdoor seating for cafes and pubs and best of all hairdressers! are able to open again from 12th April the village will start to come alive again.

Grasmere Daffodil Garden

The daffodils are out in the daffodil garden and the only thing still missing is the smell of gingerbread wafting in the air but hopefully that will happen soon too.

St Oswald’s churchyard

We hope that visitors to the village will observe the country code. During the time between lockdowns last time there was a huge amount of rubbish abandoned in the village and on surrounding fells.

Riverside walk Grasmere

Let’s hope the sun shines and everyone can enjoy a great UK staycation.

Daffodils in the churchyard

Where better to visit after being stuck at home for so long than Grasmere Village. See you soon!

Spring has sprung in Grasmere

At last the clocks have changed and the nights will be getting lighter. Summer is on it’s way and the signs are all around in Grasmere.

Grasmere Postbox and Daffodils

When I looked out at the Sports Field the other day I had seen crowds of people hanging over the wall looking at something. Curiosity got the better of me so I went to investigate what this new spectator sport could be.

Newly born lamb

Well Grasmere Sports might draw the crowds every year but the sight of lambs being born on the field was coming a close second!

Mother and lambs

Young and old were standing patiently watching the arrival of lambs right there in front of them, and I make no apologies for the number of lamb photos as they were just so cute.

Resting mother and lamb

The sun was shining too, which was a welcome sight after the long winter.

Grasmere Sports Field

The National Trust Regional Headquarters are based in Grasmere and I had to make a visit there, so decided to carry on and come back round by the path that runs from just opposite, across the field and back into Grasmere.

Helm Crag and Grasmere

Everything was waking from the long Winter, the birds sounded happy and splashes of colour were appearing.

Spring Flowers

When I came to the Millennium Bridge I decided to go round by Grasmere Daffodil Garden to see how the Daffs were progressing. Perfect timing!

Grasmere Daffodil Garden

The daffodils were in full bloom and I noticed some new slabs had been laid on the path, so I went to take a look as several people had asked me to let them know when theirs were laid.

Grasmere Daffodil Garden

I had also seen another sign of Spring on my walk, some more new arrivals will be coming soon.

Frog spawn

Hard to believe this will produce frogs swimming about, but strangely fascinating!

Just time to give William Wordsworth a nod on the way past, and nice to see he had his own Daffodils to enjoy.

Daffodils at Wordsworth's Grave Grasmere

Grasmere is perfect at any time of year but Spring has to be one of the best times to visit as the village awakes for the tourist season about to begin. Ok you know i’m going to do it! One last lamb photo.

Relaxing in Grasmere sunshine

Grasmere Riverside Walk

River Rothay Grasmere

This is a nice little circular walk round the village and takes you away from the traffic heading through the village. Suitable for wheelchairs and prams too, although it can get a bit muddy after heavy rain. It can be accessed from various places in the village.

Grasmere School

I started at the Stock Lane car park and walked along Stock Lane into the village past the village school, there used to be access through the school yard but this has been stopped as it wasn’t great when the children were out playing having random walkers crossing the playground. You can still connect to it this way at School holidays and weekends. Handy to know you can also park in the school yard during these times for a small donation through the school letter box for school funds.

Church Bridge

Crossing the river at church bridge you come to St. Oswalds church.

St Oswalds Church Grasmere

Dedicated to St Oswald, a 7th Century king of Northumbria. The oldest parts of the present church date back to Medieval times. Take the path through the churchyard which comes out at the Grasmere Gingerbread shop.

Grasmere Gingerbread Shop

The aroma will reach you before you get there. Hard to believe this tiny building was once the village school. You can also take a slight detour to your right to the Grasmere Daffodil Garden. Across from the gingerbread shop is Church Stile.

Church Stile Grasmere

A row of 17th century cottages which house the Storytellers Garden. Always worth a visit if Taffy Thomas Storyteller Laureate is at home.

You can go down to the right of the gingerbread shop beside the Wordsworth Hotel to join the riverside walk but we are carrying on through the village. Keep straight on and walk up College Street. On your right is the village green with Heaton Cooper Art Studios in front of you.

Heaton Cooper Studios Grasmere

Sam Read’s bookshop is to your left. Grasmere has a wonderful selection of independent and individual shops you won’t find anywhere else.

Sam Read's Bookshop Grasmere

Turn left at Sam Read’s and you are now on Broadgate. The whitewashed cottage across the open field to your left is a listed building called Dockwray. Dorothy Wordsworth recorded in her Grasmere Journal a visit to the cottage on May 28th 1800 to see her friend Jenny Dockewray.

Broadgate Grasmere

Walk along Broadgate until you reach the village Hall just beyond the row of shops. This is where the annual Lakes Artists Exhibition takes place in the summer. Turn down the side signposted car park while looking to your left over Broadgate meadow. You will see Grasmere’s war memorial located on a grassy bank. Close by is the “Peace oak” planted by Canon Rawnsley founder of the National Trust. It was planted on the 19th July 1919 to commemorate the fifth anniversary of the start of the Great War.

Surrounding Fells

At the far side of the car park is a footbridge over the River Rothay, this is where we are going. From here there are great views of the Fells to the East especially Stone Arthur, with it’s rocky summit, and Heron Pike the fell further to the right. The rest of the walk is along the riverside back in the direction we started from. There are several good opportunities to take photos along the way.

Grasmere signpost

You can cut up to the main road at one point or head across the fields to the Swan Hotel. In the summer months red campion flowers along the riverbank, and if you are very lucky you may see a flash of blue as a Kingfisher darts by.

Grasmere Riverside Walk

After crossing a wooden bridge, carry on until you come to a metal bridge. This is the Millennium Bridge,

Grasmere Millennium Bridge

Built, yes you guessed it, to celebrate the Millennium.

Millenium Stone

Cross over and head to the right  with Grasmere Sports field on your left,past the workingmans club and along the little lane to your left.

Grasmere Sports Field

This brings you back to the main carpark where we started. There are toilets situated here but be aware they are not open in the winter months. That’s the Riverside walk finished but perhaps visit Dove Cottage which is out of the car park to your left, and rounds off the day nicely. Nice tea rooms there too.

Grasmere Daffodil Garden

Grasmere Daffodils

Was walking along past the church in Grasmere when I spotted new stones being laid in the Daffodil Garden. This only happens a few times a year.

Laying stones, Grasmere Daffodil Garden.

Grasmere Daffodil Garden opened in 2003. A piece of waste land near the church was chosen to try and emulate Wordsworth’s famous poem.

“I wandered lonely as a cloud, that floats on high o’er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd, a host of golden daffodils.

The plan is to have 10,000 wild daffodils blowing in the breeze.

Daffodil Garden, Grasmere.

The idea of the garden is to raise funds to promote the heritage of the Vale of Grasmere and it’s traditional ways of Lake District life. This is achieved by selling Daffodil bulbs, which mean you can put down “some roots in Grasmere” yourself.

Laying stones, Grasmere Daffodil Garden.

You can also buy a stone which is engraved with your name and home town. This is laid in the form of a path through the garden. Once the path is finished, sponsorship closes. The stones are made of Lakeland slate, and tend to be bought by people who have a fondness for Grasmere. It isn’t a memorial garden, more a celebration of Grasmere. Donors names are entered in the Book of friends displayed in St Oswalds Church.

Slate stones

The charities sponsored by the garden are, The Friends of St. Oswald’s. St Oswald’s church has over 100,000 visitors per year which obviously  takes it’s toll on the building. The money helps to pay for it’s renovation and maintenance.

St Oswald's overlooks the garden.

Another charity to benefit is The Lakeland Housing Trust. Because so many houses are snapped up as holiday homes, it becomes more and more difficult to find affordable housing for locals. The Trust buys and lets homes to young families at a subsidised rent.

River Rothay from Daffodil Garden.

The Wordsworth Trust is another beneficiary, helping to preserve the literary heritage of the poet’s bond with Grasmere. His grave overlooks the garden.

Grasmere Daffodil Garden

And finally, The National Trust gets donations to help farmers to maintain country features which would be difficult otherwise because of low hill farm incomes.

So the next time you are in Grasmere enjoy the peace of the daffodil garden knowing that it is helping preserve the beautiful Vale of Grasmere.

Grasmere Daffodil Garden

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